All posts filed under: claire

festive marzipan with cranberries and pistachio

Growing up very close to my German granny meant all kinds of great things at Christmas time. Not only did I get to open some of my presents on Christmas Eve, but we also had the best food…  Stollen (with thick butter), lebkuchen by the bucketload, rumtopf (was rarely allowed to try this due to overproof alcohol content!), and of course tons of marzipan. I have very vivid memories of making marzipankugeln – rolling marzipan into balls, covering it in cocoa powder and giving them out as gifts. A pretty gourmet effort for a five-year-old. 26 years later, I felt like it was time to up my marzipan game. I’ve coated these in dark chocolate and topped them with cranberries and pistachios for a grown-up version of my childhood favourite. So easy to make, so easy to eat. Scroll down for the how to. You will need: – a block of marzipan – dark chocolate, 85% cocoa – Chopped pistachios and dried cranberries Cut your marzipan block into equal sections, then roll each one into a …

diy eucalyptus floral garland (+ video tutorial!)

  Last weekend was the annual ‘lose your mind at the flower market, make 47 wreaths and eat loads of food‘ day! The obligatory 47 wreaths were indeed made (more on that later), and banana split was eaten. After everyone left my place I decided to put together a festive garland with my floral leftovers. A garland makes a great alternative to a wreath when you need something to fill a bigger wall space, and if you can’t hang things you can use it on a sideboard or table. It is festive but not super-Christmassy, y’know? In fact I could see myself making these throughout the seasons. This garland is still hanging in my lounge room a week later, and although it has mostly dried it still looks good. I also decided to make my first ever video tutorial, which I am slightly nervous about… Please watch it and tell me what you think. Is it too long/short/weird? It was fun to put together so I expect I’ll do a few more in the future. This first …

speculoos cake with salted caramel frosting and espresso ganache

David is always teaching me all kinds of useful life skills; rock climbing, how to be good at camping, how to use photoshop etc etc, and I thought it was about time I taught him a useful life skill. Learning how to bake a cake seems like pretty essential knowledge. Last Sunday we spent all day in the kitchen, me hovering and giving instructions, and David learning why ‘softened butter’ does not require 90 seconds in the microwave. It was also a great lesson in why every spoon and bowl in the house must be used in the baking of a cake. So technically, I did not bake this cake. David baked this cake. Isn’t it excellent?! This is my recipe and I was a little more involved in making the caramel and evening off the frosting, but besides that David did the lion’s share of the actual making. I’m so impressed! Expectations for my next birthday are pretty high. This cake has all of the good things. It’s like a decadant morning tea rolled up …

Instagram challenge: #myseasonof_florals

The lovely Laura and I have started an Instagram challenge, and we’d love you all to join in. Inspired by the beauty of each season, we are asking you to add #myseasonof_florals to you floral photos for the rest of November. Each week we will be posting our favourites to Instagram and at the end of November we will pick a lucky winner to receive a mystery prize (to be announced next week!). We are only able to post the prize to Australia or New Zealand but welcome everyone to take part. You can tag as many photos as you like, please be sure to also tag @hellolaurajane and @claireyclaire on your images. Looking forward to seeing what everyone posts.

our winter wedding in the blue mountains

We got married! Twice! Back in June, Dave and I got hitched in the Blue Mountains, NSW and then flew to London and did it all over again with my family and our friends over there. Our wedding in the Blue Mountains was cosy and wintery – exactly how we wanted it. The venue was a large log cabin in Blackheath surrounded by gorgeous bushland, and almost all of our guests stayed on site in little cabins dotted around the property. Our aim for the day was to keep it informal and relaxed with plenty of good food, wine and merriment. We had log fires, lots of native flowers and tons of tealights, as well as the most gorgeous back drop of the Blue Mountains. We also got a little bit of unexpected decor – the seasonal wattle growing all over the place was beautiful! All in all we had such a fantastic day and evening, and it turned out even better than we could have imagined. I’m going to write another post later on …

three ways to use herbs to decorate a cake

I like my rainbow-funfetti-unicorn-sparkle cakes as much of the next person. I really do. But sometimes it’s nice to just keep things au naturel. Herbs can be so pretty and are much more flavoursome that candy cake decorations, so I wanted to explore some ways they could be used as edible decor, not just an ingredient. Conveniently, I had a rather naked looking honey and pear cake that needed some jazzing up, but these techniques would work with any cake. Scroll down to see how I used herbs to make it pretty (and not a rainbow sprinkle in sight). Substitute sprinkles for finely chopped herbs This one is kind of easy peasy. You can either finely chop the herb of your choice, or use tiny thyme leaves like I did. Be sure to pick a flavour that complements your cake. Once your cake is iced, just sprinkle ‘em on top. Jobs a winner. Rosemary infused drizzle Put a few sprigs of rosemary into a small saucepan, and add just enough milk to almost cover them. Heat …

how to make natural yoghurt

We eat a lot of yoghurt in our house and I’ve been making my own for about 18 months now. It’s such a satisfying process and kind of science-y. I love that it gives me more control over the type of milk my yoghurt comes from (local, organic, whatever floats your boat) as well as working out so much cheaper. There are two methods you can try to make your own yoghurt. Both methods involve heating then cooling your milk, adding culture and leaving it to incubate before fully setting in the fridge. The first is a basic, no equipment needed, but fiddly method that works well if you just want to give yoghurt-making a try, or make it occasionally. The second method is the one I use, and better suited if you plan to make loads of yoghurt and want it to be totally foolproof. Basic (but fiddly) method for making yoghurt. You will need: a litre of fresh milk and a tablespoon of natural yoghurt, plus a sterilised glass jar or tub for …

five things I learnt from the konmari method.

As someone who ‘struggles’ to keep on top of my clutter and tends to leave my junk all over the house, I was pretty keen to read Marie Kondo’s cult book, The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up to try and kick myself into shape. When I finally read it it on our honeymoon I was just blown away by it’s simplicity, and immediately made David read it after me. He is very tidy and organised by nature so was also keen to give the method a whirl. The basic idea is to go through everything in your entire house in a certain order, discarding anything that doesn’t spark joy. Everything that you keep is stored properly and neatly in a designated spot, and when you open a drawer or cupboard you should be able to see everything inside without having to shift things and rummage around (she has some great methods for achieving this!). Now, I am not going to rehash the full details of the KonMari method as you can find out about it …

blood orange meringues with blood orange and passionfruit curd

When you are lucky enough to acquire a brand new Kitchenaid and six blood oranges in the space of time between breakfast and lunch on a Saturday, you know that it’s going to be a great weekend. That was last weekend, folks. There was really only one thing to be done – put the two together and make some blood orange meringues. And then when you realise that you also have some passionfruits and it really would be quite nice to have something to dollop on top of the meringues, well then you make curd. Scroll down for the how-to. p.s. I totally realise that this is the first time I’ve posted in four months. If you are reading this, thanks for sticking with me. I’ll be following up with a few thoughts on the future of this blog in the next week or so, but for now, yay new blog post! What to do: Preheat the oven to 110°C (or 230°F), then whip up some classic meringue. To make four individual sized meringues I …

happy monday links | seven

We are finishing up a glorious four day weekend here in Australia, Easter holidays are the best. It has been a perfect mix of wholesome outdoorsy-ness (Blue Mountains hike and a quick ocean dip), achieving practical things (a whole load of wedding stuff) and lazing about (fiiiinally watching How I Met Your Mother on Netflix). Besides all of that, here are some things I have been clicking on recently: – Beautiful watercolour rocks. – The prettiest cake. – I just can’t deal with how cute this bikini is. – Fave instagram find this week. – Oh hai. – Love this colour palette. Photo by me. Follow along on Pinterest to see more things I like.