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A blog by Claire, David and their cameras. Sydney, Australia.

london | south by north

london | south by north

london | south by north

london | south by north

london | south by north

london | south by north

london | south by north

london | south by north

london | south by north

This is what a three week trip back home to London looks like.

Summer evening in Granary Square / Lobster at the Boundary Rooftop / Grafitti on Rivington Street / Vintage dress from Beyond Retro / D&AD Young Blood exhibition / Bicycle on Warren Street / Roses in Victoria Park / Delicious meal at Honey and Co / Kings Cross

Taken on my iPhone, edited with VSCO Cam. See more on my grid.

posted by Claire

diy leather headband | south by north

Did you know that you can buy bags of scrap leather from fabric shops for a few dollars? Well, I recently discovered this and have been thinking of ways to use it. The pieces are pretty small so this simple head band project is perfect, and only takes about 30 minutes. Since cutting my hair short I don’t really do anything with it, so it’s nice to jazz it up a bit!

You will need:
- small pieces of leather
- thin plastic headband
- scissors
- superglue

Cut leaf shapes from the leather scraps, trying to keep them fairly uniform. You can draw on the back of the leather, so I just cut one shape and drew round it for the rest. You will probably need about seven or eight leaves.

Follow the instructions on your superglue to stick them to the headband, layering each on over the other as you go – you should only need a few dots of glue down the middle of each piece to make it hold. Make sure it is thoroughly dry before you wear it!

posted by Claire.

diy leather headband | south by north

diy leather headband | south by northdiy leather headband | south by northdiy leather headband | south by north

 

tana gandhi | south by northLike many of my favourite internet people, I first came across Tana’s wonderful talent via her instagram feed. Her photos are light, fresh and she has one of the most beautifully consistent and imaginative styles I’ve seen. She has recently quit her day job and taken the plunge into full-time photography – I’m positive she will go far! I’m extremely honoured that Tana has put together this guest post for South by North, here she is sharing some gorgeous florals. Be sure to check out her fantastic photography on her blog and instagram.

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Hello there! This is Tana and I’m so thrilled to guest post for Claire. Today I wanted to talk about florals. It’s no secret that I definitely have a thing for flowers. Whether it’s one single stem or a mixed arrangement, they brighten my space and provide a whole lot of cheer.

This you see here is a white dahlia paired with dainty phloxes. I had no idea what phloxes were before I picked these lovelies up. They were delicate little blooms that, when they gave out, they would fall down ever so gracefully.

I enjoyed this arrangement the most because, unlike peonies, they took their time to bloom and gave me plenty of days to enjoy them! This session took place right before the light disappeared. It’s that quiet time of the evening where everything stands still for just a moment and then the light is gone. It seemed like the perfect time to document this arrangement.

What about you? Do you enjoy larger arrangements over smaller arrangements? Single stems? Let’s spread the flora cheer!

Photos and words by Tana Gandhi. Tana Gandhi is a lifestyle photographer based in Southern California. She enjoys design, blogging, yoga, and experimenting with various creative mediums. Follow her on instagram.

tana gandhi | south by northTanaGandhi-FloraStudy-3 (2)tana gandhi | south by north

 

spiced yoghurt with maple roasted plums | south by north

This week Erika Rax and Gemma are hosting a virtual morning tea in support of Cancer Council’s Biggest Morning Tea to raise money for cancer research. It is a great cause, and please head to Erika’s blog to find out how to take part and donate.

For my morning tea I have made spiced yoghurt with maple roasted plums. Recently I have been experimenting with making my own yoghurt and this is the first flavoured version – it turned out well! I love food laced with sweet spices as the weather starts to get cooler, and this was just what I was craving. All up this took about twenty minutes to put together, and most of that was waiting for the plums to cook.

To serve two you will need:
300ml plain unsweetened yoghurt
half a teaspoon of ground cinnamon
half a teaspoon of ground nutmeg
three just ripe plums
a few glugs of maple syrup

Pre-heat the oven to 180 degrees. Add the cinnamon and nutmeg to the yoghurt and stir well. Leave in the fridge until ready to serve. Cut the plums in half and place on a baking tray flesh side up, pour some maple syrup over each one. You want most of the syrup to stay on the plum rather that the tray – you will probably need about a tablespoon per plum half. Bake these in the oven for around fifteen minutes until they look soft and are starting to darken around the edges. Take them out to cool slightly, and then serve in a bowl with your spiced yoghurt. Swirl a teaspoon of maple syrup over the top before serving.

spiced yoghurt with maple roasted plums | south by north

 

 

eucalyptus and lavender diffuser diy | south by north

Now I’m sure you have seen tutorials for these online before, but I just wanted to tell you how easy they are to make. I have been meaning to put one together for ages but was just being a bit lazy about it to be honest. Now I know how easy it is, I should have done it much sooner!

You will need:
glass bottle with a narrow neck
diffuser reeds
a light carrier oil (I used grape seed as it is cheap and can be bought from the supermarket)
eucalyptus and lavender essential oils (or whichever scent you prefer)
funnel

A quick word about the diffuser reeds. These were the main source of my laziness as I couldn’t find them anywhere. I think some people swap these out for bamboo but I had read that this wouldn’t work as well – the reeds have channels that run through them to carry the scent. In the end I turned to glorious ebay and managed to pick up a huge bunch for $8.

The bottle is an old whiskey bottle I already had, and the essential oils were less than $10 each. The grapeseed oil was about $6 for a litre, and I used a small portion of this. Overall this came to be much cheaper than a store bought diffuser, as they are usually $50 or more, plus this way I have enough supplies to top up or make another. I can also mix the scent exactly as I like.

Make sure your bottle is clean, and add 50% essential oil to 50% carrier oil using the funnel. I am actually topping up my essential oils a bit, as mine is in the open plan hallway/kitchen/living room which is a large space, so it needs a slightly stronger smell. But these proportions should be enough for a bedroom or smaller room. I have also heard that adding a little vodka can help the scent spread. Pop a handful of reeds into the bottle, and flip them over once a week until the scent diminishes. Then you just need to top up the oils and replace with new reeds.

posted by Claire.

eucalyptus and lavender diffuser diy | south by north

 

 

love bex | south by north

Everyone says it, but one of the best bits about blogging and instagramming truly is coming across like-minded people and seeing some of the amazing things people create. I have decided to start a guest post series to share some of this amazingness, and I am excited to show you the first one today. Welcome to the blog Rebecca!

I came across Rebecca’s gorgeous instagram feed when someone tagged me in her picture, thinking that we would like each other’s feeds – they were spot on! It didn’t take me long to find her blog, Love Bex, and I ended up reading it pretty much the whole way through. Rebecca’s photos are wonderfully minimal, she has a great eye for framing and colour. Here she is sharing some shots of a weekend in Blackpool, and telling us what the place means to her.

Be sure to check out Rebecca’s blog and instagram feed, they are pretty fricking awesome.

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Now – when many people in the UK think about Blackpool I can bet you a good few negative words might come back in discussion. But – this is so far away about how I feel about it. Blackpool for me is where my heart will always be because it’s where my true creative pathway started.

SO how did I end up in Blackpool? I’m a country girl from a little village outside of the beautiful English Lake District, not that far away from Blackpool. I was always very determined to move away after school, so as soon as my exams were over I moved to the smog of London where I attended fashion college, with a naive view that I was going to be a fashion designer. Despite loving my time in London and making some incredibly talented friends, after trying out all the fashion related pathways, I ended up loathing anything to do with fashion. Fashion photography was definitely not where I saw my future heading, but photography was definitely something that I wanted to pursue – so I decided to transfer. After researching the best Photographic degree courses in the country, Blackpool came out top. So off I went again – A true country girl, back to the shire.

For three fantastic years – having my tutors, classmates and Blackpool as inspiration my eyes became open to the world for the first time. Blackpool made me see beauty in the everyday and in the most mundane of things. Although looking back I cringe at most of my work, I learnt an awful lot. I cherish what I took away with me even now and absolutely believe this made me who I am today. This is why my heart belongs to Blackpool.

Blackpool comes with a definite stigma attached to it – that it’s seedy and tacky, and yes in some ways it is, but looking beyond this and turning the more ‘colourful’ things into positive visions, you open your eyes to things that you would have otherwise been blind to notice and you will see nothing but colour, fun and nostalgia. Although many would disagree, Blackpool still remains the most popular seaside resort in the UK, it oozes history everywhere you go and has a real wistful longing of wanting to be there in its heyday – before it lost its battle to the cheap foreign package holiday.

Last week I decided that I wanted to explore Blackpool properly for the first time since being there as a student. I asked my old friend from Uni, Linzi, if she didn’t mind giving me a tour around all the new attractions as well as revisiting the old tourist landmarks. Linzi is a well known creative in the area, and does many community art projects within the Fylde coast.

With the Fish and chip soaked air and the added smell of candy floss and Blackpool rock in our noses we quite happily walked most of the Promenade and around the town. We walked all three piers that still stand exploring the many rides and amusement arcades within them. We purposely avoided the fortune-tellers and laughing clowns as best we could and dodged the trams on more than one occasion. We watched in complete awe at the dancers waltzing elegantly around the ballroom of the Tower and we were lucky enough to witness the beautiful sandy beaches before the tide came in. Sadly we didn’t manage to catch a donkey ride or nip into the theatre but we got to explore a few more of the well known attractions such as the Pleasure Beach, Winter Gardens and the Comedy Carpet. We left the Zoo, Waterpark, Wax Works, Sea Life Centre and Dungeons to the proper tourists.

Blackpool is definitely one town that I love to talk about, It holds so many fond memories and is the key to my creative heart.

Words and pictures by Rebecca Iris Slack.

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